Pre-launch offer “Go Gluten Free” online package – don’t miss out!

Do you think you may have a problem with gluten?  Yes, going gluten free has become a bit of a fad and many of us are sick of hearing about it.  But, if you have digestive issues, a thyroid disorder or any autoimmune disease, the evidence for going gluten-free is stacking up.  Go gluten free safely and healthily and reduce your symptoms – it’s NOT about swapping to the Free-from food section.

Read my Gluten posts HERE

It’s suggested that everyone with an autoimmune disease can benefit from going gluten-free. This is because gluten causes the release of a substance called Zonulin in our digestive system. Zonulin is responsible for the tight junctions between the cells of our gut lining. Tight junctions control the substances that pass through the gut lining and into the blood stream. When zonulin is high, the tight junctions are loose, meaning that large molecules and microbes can pass through into our blood and be detected by our immune system.

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“Leaky gut”, and therefore gluten, is arguably the root cause of autoimmune diseases, including Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (hypothyroidism), Grave’s disease, Celiac’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis) and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

In fact, for thyroid conditions gluten causes the immune system to attack the thyroid tissue through a processed called molecular mimicry – your immune cells mistake your thyroid cells for gluten and destroy them.

In my Go Gluten Free package, I provide you with the information and tools to safely and easily go gluten free in a healthy and sustainable way.

Click here to get the Go Gluten Free package for the EARLY BIRD Price.

Here are just some things you have the potential to gain:bread-399286_1920

  • Better digestion
  • Better concentration
  • Better weight management
  • Fewer joint aches and pains
  • More energy
  • More stable blood sugar levels
  • Better mood
  • Reduced risk of chronic disease 

If you struggle with gluten, by completing this 4-week coaching package you’ll be healthier, have more energy and may have reduced your risk for chronic illness!

Just a few days to get the Go Gluten Free package for the early bird price.

Sign up HERE for health news and coaching offers!

Top tips for healthy eating

Last week I attended the College of Medicine’s conference “Food. The Forgotten Medicine.” It was really interesting and uplifting to hear that some doctors are now acknowledging that food is a cornerstone of good health.  They also recognised that the 0 – 6 hours of nutrition training doctors get in Medical school is insufficient (and could explain why your doctor is reluctant to discuss any dietary interventions).

I’m hoping that the role of the health coach will soon be accepted and respected by the medical profession. As a health coach (PhD) , I have the time and expertise to talk through your diet and lifestyle. To hear your concerns and to understand your unique experience.  I can then work with you, as an individual, to find the right dietary and lifestyle changes so you feel better for the long-term.

It was a shame that only one patient had a voice at the conference and that she was the very last speaker. Carrie Grant gave an brilliant synopsis of her story with inflammatory bowel disease, and how hard it is to take control of your health in the current health system. It’s difficult to be a knowledgeable patient – as I know only too well.  As Carrie put it, the consultant hold the power, “and they kind of like it”.

It was highlighted again and again at the conference that the typical “healthy’ diet that many people have been following for decades (due to government guidelines) is wrong and even dangerous.  The NHS recommends you “Base meals on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates” – do NOT do this…

Top tips:

  1. Carbohydrates cause problems. Carbohydrates (e.g. flour, pasta, bread, rice etc) cause chronic low levels of inflammation that ultimately lead to disease e.g. Cancer, heart disease, autoimmune and inflammatory diseases (IBS, Crohn’s, thyroid disease, arthritis, ulcerative colitis etc). Carbohydrates therefore should NOT form the main component of a healthy diet (contrary to the NHS eat well guidelines).
  2. Fats are good. We need them – 60% of our brain is fat, what do you think happens to that on a low fat diet? But, we need the right kind of fats, ones that reduce inflammation rather than cause it. We need the omega 3 fatty acids found in nuts, seeds, olive oil and fish, and smaller amounts of  omega 6 fatty acids found in animal products. Processed food should be avoided at all costs as these are unhealthily high in omega 6 and trans fats, which are toxic.
  3. Fruit Juice is NOT healthy.  Fruit juice, fresh or otherwise, contains a lot of sugar. Without the fibre you get by eating fruit, this sugar goes straight into your blood and causes a stress response in the form of insulin production.
  4. Wholegrain is only wholegrain when it is the whole grain. You might want to read that again. Basically it means that a wholegrain ceases to be whole once you mill it. Milled grains are easy to digest so the sugar that it digests down into rapidly goes into your blood.  Wholegrain is more difficult to digest and so releases sugars slowly.
  5. Refined sugar alternatives are often no better. Sugar, in any form, will cause a stress response in your body. Many alternatives, like agave syrup, contain up to 75% fructose, which can alter the insulin pathway. It’s unclear exactly what sugar substitutes, artificial or otherwise, do to the body. You should avoid eating anything artificial. Natural sweetness that trick the brain are likely to cause problems with signalling.

If you’re suffering from a chronic inflammatory or autoimmune condition, making these few adjustments to your diet could have a big impact on your symptoms. There are lots of positive dietary and lifestyle changes you could make so that you can live symptom free, or even reverse your condition (as with type 2 diabetes).

Seek the information, make healthy choices, live well and feel better!

Caroline x

Ignoring your gluten intolerance

I believe that every one is unique, and has a unique set of foods that promote health and equally has foods which encourage disease. I don’t believe that gluten is the root of all evil and that everyone should stop eating it, but ignoring a gluten intolerance could have long-term consequences.

I have spoken with a lot of people who know that gluten doesn’t agree with them. They get bloated after they eat it, they have aches and pains and sometimes get cramps, yet they don’t want to stop eating “like a normal person”. I hear this time and time again, and I can completely relate to it. Change is difficult. It takes energy and effort, and when we are ill or fatigued – or suffering from the symptoms of gluten intolerance – it’s difficult to muster the will power.

I get it. I’ve been there. I have also been desperately ill. I was virtually housebound  at 27 years old for nearly 18 months. I ached all over, I had no energy and simply talking was draining. All the doctors I went to said that I was a healthy 27 year old. I needed to make a big change and to take matters into my own hands. I drastically changed my diet, my lifestyle and grew as a person.  Going entirely gluten free was a significant part of getting my health – and my life – back.

You may not be as ill as I was and you may find your symptoms manageable. But what is it doing to your body? If you have symptoms of dis-ease, your body is telling you something.

If you ignore your gluten intolerance, you may be setting yourself up for future health problems. Here are a few things to consider:

  1. Increased risk of cancer, heart disease, obesity and diabetes

Our digestive system is responsible for absorbing food as well as detecting and mounting an immune response to things that may harm us – usually bacteria or other mircoorganisms.

70% of our immune system is located in our gastrointestinal tract (Faria and Weiner 2005).

If you are gluten intolerant, immune mechanisms in your gut recognize gluten as an invader that needs eliminating and so your body activates an immune response designed to kill-off the invader. It’s a misdirected response as gluten is not an infectious agent. Mounting such an immune response is not only exhausting, but also dangerous – these first immune responses are designed to be temporary toxic storms to efficiently protect us from infection. Constantly or repeatedly activating this system leads to chronic inflammation – something that is directly related to increased risk of heart disease, obesity, cancer and diabetes.

  1. Nutrient deficiencies – malnourishment

Continuing to eat gluten when you are intolerant to it can cause the lining of your digestive tract to become inflamed, damaged and stripped of the protective mucous coating (villous atrophy). This damage stops nutrients from being absorbed properly and can lead to malnutrition, usually in the form of vitamin and mineral deficiencies. Symptoms can include fatigue, dry skin, brittle hair, poor concentration, frequent illness and failure to thrive in children – the list extensive. It’s worth bearing in mind that you can be nutrient deficient and over weight.

  1. Increased risk of autoimmune disease

In addition to being inflamed an unable to absorb nutrients effectively, zonulin (derived from gluten) can cause gaps to form in your gut lining. This is known as intestinal hyperpermeability or leaky gut. It means that food particles and bacteria can pass through your gut wall straight into your blood stream. If this happens, your immune system will go into overdrive to get rid of the invaders – and it stays on high alert for weeks, which is exhausting, depleting and potentially harmful. Leaky gut can lead to chronic poor health and the development of more intolerances, such as to the milk protein casein, and autoimmune diseases – where the immune system attacks the body. Most people with an autoimmune condition feel better on a gluten-free diet. Interestingly, components of gluten have a similar structure to protein structures in our bodies – particularly those within the thyroid. If you have an autoimmune disease, consuming gluten will cause your immune system to attack your body – there is a well-studied link between Celiac disease and thyroid conditions.

Autoimmune diseases include: 

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis

Grave’s disease

Celiac disease

Addison’s disease

Psoriasis

Rheumatoid arthritis

And many, many more!

I hope you’ve found this informative! If you’re considering going gluten-free, check out my Go Gluten-Free online coaching package. For just £10 (US$14.50) a week, this 4-week package provides you with the tools and guidance so you can make informed choices about your health and instigate positive and lasting change.

Launching June 24th 2016! Early Birds get a 25% Discount, so register today by emailing me now: caroline@flourishwellness.co.uk!

Look after yourself!

Caroline x

P.S. Don’t forget coach One2One – helping you to reach your health goals and to feel better.  I offer a FREE Discovery Session wherever you are in the world! Drop me a line HERE!

The truth about Gluten

We have all now heard of Gluten. But do we all know what it is and why we ‘should’ be avoiding it?

Cutting gluten from my diet was a huge factor in my recovery from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (though I didn’t know it at the time), in shrinking my goitre and significantly reducing many of my Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis symptoms.

But, many people think that going “gluten-free” is a fad and that it’s just the latest dieting craze, and for some that is true. For others it is the difference between health and disease – and sometimes that disease is Cancer, sometimes it’s Crohn’s, which could mean losing your intestine, and sometimes it is an autoimmune disease that could continue to attack your body.

Many people don’t know if they should be avoiding gluten or not. These people tend to dabble in gluten-free living. They perhaps buy some items from the “free-from” ranges that now adorn supermarket aisles and feel somewhat virtuous when they manage to consume a gluten-free sandwich (if, of course, it holds together long enough it eat it). But does eating mostly gluten-free count? And what exactly is gluten anyway?

What is Gluten?

  • Gluten is a complex of proteins found naturally in the seeds of cereal grains.
  • The gluten protein types that can cause adverse reactions are glutelins (glutenin) and prolamins (gliadin).
  • These proteins are also responsible for the unique properties of gluten, which make it so appealing for baking – trapping air to enable dough to rise, giving elasticity to bread and dough as well as a chewy texture.
  • Gluten-containing seeds include: bulgar wheat, durum wheat, barley, rye, kamut, faro, graham, semolina, triticale, einkorn and spelt.
  • Gluten is used as a protein supplement (particularly in Asian cultures e.g. seitan), as a thickener in sauces, flavourings, medications, stock cubes and sweets.
  • Gluten is much more widespread in the Western diet, where processed food is more common and widely available.

Check out some of my gluten-free recipes HERE and HERE

What is Gluten Intolerance?

The term “Gluten intolerance” is often used to describe three conditions:

  1. Celiac (coeliac) Disease: Autoimmune disease, where the body responds with an overreactive adaptive immune response, triggered by gliadin and primarily concerning the small intestine. It may manifest several hours or days after consuming gluten. This response harms the delicate villi structures and lining of the intestine responsible for nutrient absorption. An inflammation response may also occur leading to leaky gut syndrome – where large proteins pass through the gut lining, and often leading to chronic poor health and the development of other intolerances. Celiac disease can be confirmed by a blood test for the relevant antibodies and biopsy, though negative results do not mean that you don’t have it.
  1. Wheat Allergy: Strictly speaking is and allergy and not an intolerance. This is an immediate and often severe histamine reaction to the presence of wheat (not specifically gluten). People may develop hives, shortness of breath and swelling – this is known as Type 1 hypersensitivity and is a different type of immune response to that of Celiac disease. 
  1. Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS): This is the least well defined of the gluten intolerances. Currently, people who test negative for Celiac disease and who do not present with wheat allergy, but still feel unwell upon eating gluten are labeled with NCGS. They likely also have a “leaky gut” and a host of symptoms associated with a malfunctioning digestive system. People particularly susceptible include those with an autoimmune disease.

Should I quit Gluten?

Cutting gluten from your diet if you aren’t gluten intolerant is unnecessary, but many people are unsure. If you suffer from digestive issues –irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, bloating, cramps, discomfort, weight problems, if you have dry skin and rashes or if you feel very tired after eating gluten and have difficulty concentrating – it’s likely you have a problem with gluten. In which case, going gluten-free will:

  1. Help you achieve good long-term health
  2. Alleviate symptoms
  3. Increase your energy and improve your mood

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Going gluten-free can be overwhelming as it’s in so many things and many of us include it in every meal and snack. You may wonder what on Earth you can eat on a gluten-free diet!

On June 24th I am launching my Go Gluten-free online coaching package. This is a 4-week package that will guide you safely through the tricky transition to gluten-free living. I provide you with information and tools so you can make informed decisions about your health and then implement lasting change. I also enable you to conclusively determine whether you are gluten intolerant and I’ll be on hand to answer your questions. Read more HERE or send me an email: caroline@flourishwellness.co.uk

25% Early Bird Discount if you register by June 17th! Just £30 to transform your health!

Follow my website HERE to receive the next Blog post straight to your inbox and of course Like my Facebook page!

Look after your health and be well!

Caroline x

P.S. Did you read my post “Is your immune system attacking you?”, you might find it useful in reaching your health goals!

Symptoms of Gluten Intolerance

Everyone’s talking about gluten at the moment, so much so that if you mention you may have a problem with gluten you are normal met with rolling eyes or a comment like “you and everyone else…”

For those of us who genuinely react badly to gluten, this can be really tiresome and hurtful. Gluten is the root cause of many horrible symptoms in a lot of people and can cause and exasperate disease. I for one do not want to be unwell again (read my health stories here and here) and I know that eating gluten will set my health a long way back.

For those of you who brush gluten-free diets off as a fad, have a close look at the list of symptoms of gluten intolerance below and consider whether you’d like to suffer with them daily.

Symptoms of gluten intolerance:

Bloating
Abdominal pain/cramping
Diarrhea and/or constipation
Anemia
Arthritis
ADHD
Back pain
Stomach rumbling
Brittle nails
Mouth ulcers
Depression/anxiety
Dry hair
Fatigue
Flatulence
Unusually smelly stools
Hair loss
Infertility
Joint pain
Lactose/milk protein intolerance
Nausea
Numbness/tingling in hands and feet
Weight loss/poor weight management
Urticaria
Gum problems

Look out for my next post “The Truth about Gluten” – I’ll give you a run down of what gluten is and what happens when you have an intolerance to it.

Do you know you have an intolerance but are struggling to get gluten out of your C_14life?  Don’t worry! I’m launching my Go gluten-free online coaching package on June 24th 2016!  This package provides you with information, tools and strategies to go gluten-free safely and easily and to make it stick – for just £40 (US$58) and in just 4-weeks!

Not sure if you have a gluten intolerance? This package is perfect – I will guide you through the process of determining whether gluten is the cause of your discomfort.

Just think, in a few weeks you could shake all those symptoms you recognised above and finally feel better.

Get in touch now to reserve your package and receive the

Early Bird 25% discount!

Be well!

Caroline x

Dr Caroline Puschendorf

caroline@flourishwellness.co.uk

P.S. Don’t forget that I offer FREE Discovery Sessions so if you have a health concern that you want to address, get in touch and let’s see how we can work together to achieve your health goals!

P.P.S. Concerned about your diet? Have a read of my post about Sugar HERE and Fat HERE

4 signs your immune system is attacking you (and what you can do about it)

Autoimmune and inflammatory diseases  are becoming more prevalent and include Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, Grave’s disease, Celiac’s disease, type 2 diabetes, arthritis, eczema, asthma, irritable bowl syndrome and Crohn’s Disease.

Most of us know someone with one of these, and some of us are unlucky enough to have one ourselves.

These diseases occur when our immune system goes wrong and attacks parts of our body, like the thyroid in my case, and/or when our immune system is constantly triggered into activation – Chronic Inflammation.

If having one of those diseases wasn’t bad enough, chronic inflammation also increases the risk of heart disease and stroke (Kristensen et al. 2013) and is linked with 25% of cancers (Eiró and Vizoso 2012). Click here to read my about experience as a carer for Cancer.

It’s really important to be aware of inflammation and to keep it as low as possible.

4 signs of chronic inflammation:

  1. You’ve been diagnosed with an autoimmune or inflammatory disease
  2. Tiredness and fatigue
  3. Muscle and joint aches and pains
  4. Strange things are happening with your digestion – e.g. you feel you have developed food intolerances, you have lost or gained weight or you are bloated.

(the last 3 points are general signs that something might be wrong and may need further exploration in collaboration with your doctor).

How to reduce inflammation

The best way to ensure we don’t put our body through any unnecessary inflammation is to avoid situations that tend to provoke it. Unfortunately, usually the foods we eat and the lifestyles we lead tend to promote chronic inflammation.

Here are 5 things to cut out today:

  1. Refined sugar and starches – These trigger the release of inflammatory messengers (cytokines) and are linked with increased intestinal permeability. Want to quit sugar? Contact me HERE.
  2. Alcohol (see my post “Why I’m going Dry for January”)
  3. Red meat – the NHS guidelines suggest a daily intake of 70g/day. See what Cancer Research UK has to say about it HERE.
  4. Stress – does what it says on the tin. Our bodies weren’t designed to be in constant fight or flight mode. Take time to relax, be mindful and look after your body.
  5. Chemical irritants – Get rid of unnecessary chemicals in and around your home! Help your family and the environment at the same time. Hints and tips for going eco-friendly coming soon!

Sign up for news, offers and tips HERE

Your body and lifestyle are unique and so your inflammation triggers will be.  

Get in touch to work out what yours are and start feeling well again! 

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