Vegetable of the Month – Celeriac for September

Eating with the seasons is the best way to nourish your body and to care for the environment. Fruits and vegetables bought out of season have usually traveled a long way and are may have less nutrients as they are picked before they are ripe. Many of us are familiar with the “ripen at home” range in supermarkets, which usually leads to produce going rotten before it ripens.

Solve this problem, support local growers and your health by eating seasonably!

Celeriac is in season from September to April, and is an often-overlooked vegetable.

It is a root vegetable, with a slight nutty flavour. Prepare it by top and tailing with a sharp knife then using a potato peeler to remove the skin. You can boil it (about 20minutes) or roast it (about 40 minutes). I often add it to soups and to mixed roast vegetables e.g. with beetroot and sweet potato.

Health Benefitsceleriac

Celeriac is nutrient rich (as most vegetables are!), and therefore confers a lot of health benefits. The extraordinary quantity if vitamin K and presence of calcium and phosphorous in Celeriac helps to maintain bone density and prevent osteoporosis. Celeriac also has a lot of Vitamin B6, which prevents nerve damage and aids communication among nerve cells. For these reasons, it is thought to be beneficial for those suffering with Parkinson’s disease. Vitamin C, and other antioxidants, helps to maintain a healthy immune system, enabling us to heal wounds efficiently and to fight off infection. Celeriac contains both soluble and insoluble fibre, which promote a healthy digestive system and to control blood sugar.

Have you tried Celeriac before? Why not give it a go?

With warmth,

Caroline x

25% OFF Flourish Coaching Packages!

Hello lovely people,

I’m having a 25% OFF Flash Sale on Flourish coaching packages, including THE REBOOT and Go Gluten Free!

Offer ends on September 1st – so grab it quick!  

Don’t worry, you can start the coaching package at a time that suits you, just make sure you get it while its on offer!

“The Reboot was great, I feel so much better and I can revisit it at any time!”

The Reboot – This package is perfect if you want to take control of your health, get your eating habits back on track, lose a bit of weight, get your energy back or begin to deal with a chronic health problem, like IBS, Crohn’s, or a thyroid issue.

How it worksThe Reboot is a 4-week package that walks you through making sustainable change. You get to set the pace and decide what changes you want to make. The Reboot fits with YOUR unique lifestyle – that’s the beauty.

In the first week, Cleanse, you may decide to cut down on caffeine so switch your morning coffee for a cup of tea. You may decide to go all-out and cut out all processed food!  Each week you build on the changes and by the end you’ll feel amazing!

Don’t worry, the package walks you through it all and gives you ideas on how to achieve what you want!

Get it HERE NOW!

Go Gluten Free – This is a great package if you think you may have a problem with gluten but feel overwhelmed at the prospect of going gluten free, when you are already so busy.  It’s also a MUST for anyone with IBS, Crohn’s or a Thyroid issue, as gluten plays such a key role in these diseases.  Going Gluten free is the best way to test whether you can feel better on a Gluten-free diet. 

How it works – the Go Gluten Free package provides you with all the information you need to go gluten free in a safe and healthy way. It provides you will tools and ideas, such as a food swap list and recipe ideas, as well as an action plan for how you can cut gluten out of your life.

It’s a bargain at just £30!  Grab it NOW Click HERE

“The gluten free package took the hassle out of it for me, and now I know that gluten was affecting my health.”

Once you are enrolled on any Flourish Package, you can get One-2-One sessions about your package for Just £35!

Email me if you have any questions or would like some more info!

Grab a package and feel better soon!

With warmth,

Caroline xxx

Hypothyroidism and the Sun

I have Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. I’m not sure exactly how long I’ve had it for, but I’m pretty sure it was at some point in my teens when it first set in. I’ve been managing my symptoms and helping others to do so using my immunology background and nutrition training.

Recently though, I’ve been marvelling at how well I felt while I was away on holiday in Costa Rica.

I’ve been feeling well overall for a long time now, but usually it is something that I have to constantly manage. If I slip up with my diet or get too little sleep, then I really pay the price – there isn’t much of a buffer.

But apparently this is not the case in the tropics!  I was able to manage jet lag (with two jet lagged children) and big dietary changes (from very high veg and low carb to high carb and low veg…) with no problem at all. I was even waking up refreshed after a very little sleep!

Amazing.

So what was going on?  I’ve always loved the tropics and I am convinced it’s the temperature, humidity and the sunshine that help my body work better. Even though I didn’t sun bathe – I was either in the shade with the kids, in my rash vest attempting to surf or walking around with suncream and a hat – I got a light tan and felt the difference.

Vitamin D plays a huge role in moderating our immune systems, and that it is really important (but usually deficient) in people with autoimmune conditions (like Hashimoto’s thyroiditis).

I can help you get your thyroid condition under control and to feel your best as soon as possible!  Email me now to book your Free Discovery Session EMAIL CAROLINE

Getting that extra bit of sunshine (carefully of course) definitely helps me.  I also acknowledge that getting away from it all and being on holiday undoubtably makes things better!

So what does this mean for those of us in temperate regions?  Interestingly autoimmune conditions are more prevalent in temperate zones.  I’d suggest getting out in that sunshine, or even daylight, as much as possible and in a safe way and keeping warm by layering up, especially when it’s breezy!

Have you been on holiday this summer? How did you feel?

Caroline xx

Don’t forget to check out my coaching HERE.  I can help you get your thyroid condition under control and to feel your best as soon as possible!  Email me now to book your Free Discovery Session EMAIL CAROLINE

Going chemical-free improved my health

It’s suspected that allergies, asthma, some cancers and reproductive disorders are increasing, in part, due to the use of chemicals in our homes and on our bodies. For 99% of common chemicals (i.e. those used in household and beauty products), there is too little information on their safety – we don’t know their effects on our health or on the environment.

When I had Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) I made big changes to my diet and to my lifestyle and I felt a lot better. But, it wasn’t until I switched to chemical-free living that I completely recovered.  I believe that was because my body could finally stop having to process and eliminate the various irritants and toxins I was inadvertently exposing myself to.

Also, I think going chemical-free helped settle my hormones. So many beauty products (including shampoos, conditioners and moisturisers) have hormone-disrupting chemicals in them.  This should be a HUGE red flag for everyone, but it should particularly concern people with hormone problems such as thyroid disorders and adrenal problems.

Cancer has also darkened our doors, so using chemicals when water and a special cloth with do the job just as well, if not better!

Also, any chemical you use in your home will go straight into the environment. So going chemical-free also helps the planet – win-win!

Going chemical-free is a bit of a lifestyle change, and can seem daunting – I know only too well. It’s hard to figure out how to clean your house without cleaners (right!?) and what about your body products?!

Here’s what I did, and it’s actually really quick and simple to make the switch – and TOTALLY WORTH IT!

I first made the switch when I was living in Australia, and there was a lovely local shop that made and sold their own plant-based beauty products, which was perfect. At that time I used a combination of traditional cleaning concoctions, like lemon, vinegar and bicarbonate of soda. It was alright, but a bit of a pain and not quick and easy.

Now I live in the UK have discovered better ways to be chemicals-free. I use various brands of organic, chemical-free shampoo and conditioner. I use organic coconut oil, sesame oil or this cream to moisturise and I use a range of body cloths (microfibre so no need for soap!), organic soap and shower gel.  I find the Norwex make-up remover cloths to be fabulous – they remove all make-up with just water, and gently cleanses your face without stripping it, so great even if you don’t wear make-up. I use them everyday!

Chemical-Free_Badges_GreenFor my home, I exclusively use Norwex products because they are the best I have found and I like the company’s ethos. I haven’t looked back. Norwex has made the transition to chemical-free living so much easier, because cleaning with their products is so quick and easy! (No really, it’s almost addictive and I am not a compulsive cleaner!).

Since I switched to Norwex EnviroCloths (and stopped using chemical cleaners) and Norwex Washing Powder my health has improved, son’s persistent nighttime cough has gone and I’m not freaking out about giving my kids Cancer by using chemicals on and around them (I know that sounds dramatic, but when it’s that close to home, these fears are real).

I also wouldn’t do without the Blue Diamond Bathroom cleaner, which is a natural product that gives that extra clean to the areas that really need it!  You dilute it down so much that it lasts for ages.

I’ve also just had first hand experience of the amazing Odour Eliminator, as our cats used the cupboard under the stairs as a latrine while we were on holiday – nice.  I’ve cleaned it all without using chemicals, and there is no cat pee smell – amazing.

I haven’t come across anything that I can’t clean chemical-free.

Still have your doubts?  Get in touch if you have any questions!

Be healthy!

C_14Caroline xxx

caroline@flourishwellness.co.uk

Blood tests, hypothyroidism and vitamin D

I’ve recently got back from a fabulous holiday in Costa Rica, Central America. I am super lucky to be able to go there; I have amazing family and friends there, it’s beautiful, very biodiverse, the people are delightful and you can walk into a lab like a highstreet shop and order any blood test you like.

I know that this is quite a privileged thing to be able to do, and I wouldn’t advise that you do it unless you know how to interpret the results or have a doctor who can help you with it (I also saw an endocrinologist while I was there).

In the UK getting your own blood tests done isn’t possible. Here your GP has to order the blood tests, which means they first have to think that the tests are worth ordering and that the NHS should spend money on them. Even then, the lab tech running the tests can decide not to bother if they don’t think it’s relevant (I’m not kidding, this has happened twice with my Husband’s tumour markers!). It’s therefore quite uncommon for vitamin deficiency tests to be run, for example.  We also don’t get the full thyroid panel, or levels of antibodies. This lack of monitoring can make it hard to determine whether the changes you are making to your lifestyle and diet are having a positive effect on your hypothyroidism.

I can walk you through the diet and lifestyle changes you need to help your thyroid in a safe and systematic way, that’s unique for you! Click HERE

So I went with a plan. I wanted to know whether the vitamin supplements I have been taking are A) having an effect on my vitamin levels (i.e. being assimilated properly) and B) whether I should continue to take them.

I try not to take vitamins unless I really need to. In a lot of cases it’s unclear what a high dose of some vitamins can do, and there has been a fair amount of bad press out there. On the other hand, we know our bodies need certain vitamins, and for hypothyroid people, vitamin deficiencies are common and often undermine the health changes you’re making. For me Vitamin D is an important one – many hypothyroid people assimilate vitamin D poorly, yet it has such a huge role in moderation our immune systems. We don’t really get it from our food, and in the UK, getting it through sun exposure can be challenging.  Personally, I take a high dose Vitamin D3 supplement. In doing so, I need to watch my calcium levels as these can drop. SO I was curious to see what my test results showed.

Interestingly, despite this high dose supplement, my vitamin D levels were right on the boundary of being deficient. This means one of two things 1) that my VitD levels without the high dose supplements are ridiculously low or 2) that the supplement isn’t being assimilated. I don’t know which is the answer, though I do know that I start to feel tired, lethargic and brain-foggy when I skip my Vit D for a few days.

Luckily my blood work showed perfect Calcium levels, so no worries there.

Of course I had anti-thyroid antibodies, as you’d expect with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, and my white blood cells were slightly low – again common with my thyroid condition.

So, I’m sticking with the Vitamin D supplements and continuing to eat right and be well!  I’ll be back on the calcium-rich bone broth ASAP!

Caroline x

Vegetable of the Month – Broccoli for August!

Eating with the seasons is the best way to nourish your body and to care for the environment. Fruits and vegetables bought out of season have usually traveled a long way and are may have less nutrients as they are picked before they are ripe. Many of us are familiar with the “ripen at home” range in supermarkets, which usually leads to produce going rotten before it ripens.

Solve this problem, support local growers and your health by eating seasonably!

Broccoli is a member of the Brassica family, along with cabbage, cauliflower, Brussel sprouts and a lot more. It’s best from the end of July/August to October. Make sure your broccoli is crisp and firm and not yellowing.

Broccoli is best steamed – for 3-5 minutes – to retain as many nutrients as possible and to make it easier to digest than when its raw.

Broccoli is incredibly high in vitamin K, needed for Vitamin D production, vitamin C, vital for immune support (higher in broccoli than citrus fruits and without the sugar). vitamin A, which helps maintain healthy eye sight and B6 – used to produce seretonin and for nerve protection.

Health Benefitsbroccoli-952532__180

Broccoli’s nutrient density and diversity make it a great vegetable for reducing oxidative stress (it’s high in antioxidants), inflammation and retention of toxins – three big contributors to chronic disease. Broccoli has cancer-preventative and even fighting components (e.g. the isothiocyanate  sulphoraphane and Indole-3-carbinol), which stimulate the immune system, reduce inflammation and stimulate liver enzymes (i.e. aid with detoxification). It also has a high fibre content – great for maintaining a healthy digestive tract.

Steamed Broccoli on the menu tonight!

Be well,

Caroline x

 

Tips for eating out gluten-free

A lot of my clients come to me well aware that they need to cut gluten out of their diets. For some it is because they know their body reacts badly to it – they can feel it with bloating and cramps (read gluten intolerance symptoms HERE). Some may have been given a diagnosis of Celiac’s disease (an autoimmune where gluten triggers the body to attack the gut), other autoimmune diseases, like Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, or have irritable bowl syndrome (IBS) or inflammatory bowl disease (IBD), such as Crohn’s.

Going Gluten Free isn’t a cure-all and it isn’t going to help everyone, but for many people in the above groups, it is definitely worth a try to see if symptoms diminish.

However, the number 1 reason people tell me that they can’t go gluten free is because of eating out. Many of my clients are “90%” gluten free – but that doesn’t work (read HERE for reasons why).

I am gluten-free because gluten causes my thyroid disease to flare-up. My husband and son are also gluten free, and therefore, by default, so is my daughter. I’m also dairy, egg and soy-free (as these also caused adverse reactions, common for those with Hashimoto’s).

So, eating out can turn into a whole lot of aggravation and not a lot of pleasure. This is particularly the case with gluten-free kids. They want to have a good time and I don’t want to deprive them, but most kids menus have ZERO vegetables, or if they do it’s a token portion of grey peas with fish and chips. Everything on a kids menu comes with chips (which OK are technically gluten free…), and/or in batter or in a bun. I have to admit, this does annoy me – what example are we setting our kids about healthy eating? Anyway, that’s not what this post is about…

I have noticed recently that more restaurants are onboard with gluten free eating. I think this is probably because of a change in legislation surrounding food allergies.

My biggest gripes about eating out with intolerances/allergies are:

  1. The lack on information on menus – if the chicken comes with a cream sauce, write it on the menu!  If the kids sorbet comes on a bed of biscuit crumbs (even when you have told the staff he is gluten-free), write it on the menu!
  2. Being handed a ring-binder folder of spreadsheets documenting all possible allergens that may be in the kitchen, which doesn’t correspond to the meals on the menu, is not helpful. I didn’t come out to study.

Think you should be Gluten Free?  Check out my online Go Gluten Free coaching package. Provides you with the information and tools to go gluten free and determine if you have a problem with it.  CLICK HERE for more info. 

It’s true, while others are getting drinks and catching-up with old friends, I am usually scanning the various menus and spreadsheets for something to feed my family.  Do I get irritated every now and then when something turns up coated in breadcrumbs or slathered in butter, when I have spent half of my evening discussing gluten-containing ingredients with staff? Well yes. And for that I am sorry.

But, is being gluten free worth this hassle?  YES, absolutely.

So, my Top Tips for eating out Gluten-Free:

  1. Announce your intolerances when you book the table or at least upon arrival.  I still don’t enjoy doing this. Sometimes I just want to be “normal” and to not have the wait staff surreptitiously pointing at me and talking.  BUT, it can save you a lot of hassle at the restaurant. Some places like you to choose your meal ahead of time. This slightly takes the spontaneity out of the event, but could save you from being ill – it’s a trade off (as ever).
  2. Be prepared to be flexible. There may be one dish on the menu that they can adapt for you. It probably won’t be your first or even second choice, but try to go with it.
  3. Be aware of menu misinformation. Thinking I can get away with not announcing my intolerances has got me into gluten-trouble many times. I have fallen into the trap of ordering what reads on the menu as a simple chicken and vegetables or nut roast with seasonal veg.  This usually comes with some hidden allergen, like breadcrumbs in the nut roast or vegetables cooked in butter – see point 1, it’s best to announce your intolerances.
  4. Know your allergens/gluten-containing foods. Even though wait staff and chefs are now supposed to be trained in this, do not rely on them. On many an occasion I have been offered a “gluten-free” meal, which contains barely or rye or even breadcrumbs! Sausages, unless specifically stated, will contain gluten.  Crisps/chips with flavouring usually contain gluten. Most sauces and gravies also contain gluten, though some are thickened with cornflour. If you are in any doubt then avoid it.
  5. You can usually get an extra side of vegetables – ask!  I have noticed that once over the shock and fear of having to deal with someone with an intolerance/allergy, restaurant staff are keen to make a good impression (especially if they have handed you a folder and asked you to piece together your own meal). I often ask if I can swap things, such as a a side of garlic bread for an extra portion of vegetables. This is also often the case if they have to take something gluten-containing out of the main meal.
  6. As a last resort, if you are very worried that there won’t be anything you can have, then eat a small meal before you go out. Then order a starter or salad.

It can be hard, and challenging and frustrating, but sticking to your gluten-free diet when eating out is really important for your health. If in doubt, don’t have it.

Need some help with your Gluten Free diet?  Email me caroline@flourishwellness.co.uk or CLICK HERE for my Go Gluten Free package

Vegetable of the Month – Beetroot for July

Eating with the seasons is the best way to nourish your body and to care for the environment. Fruits and vegetables bought out of season have usually traveled a long way and are may have less nutrients as they are picked before they are ripe. Many of us are familiar with the “ripen at home” range in supermarkets, which usually leads to produce going rotten before the ripen.

Solve this problem, support local growers and your health by eating seasonably!

Beetroot is a purple root vegetable, and relative of spinach, that many of us will have only ever eaten cooked and preserved in vinegar. There is a whole lot more to Beetroot! I can be eaten cooked or raw (as in juices and smoothies) and in sweet or savoury dishes.

I love to roast beetroot slowly in the oven (about 2 hours), then add it to a variety of dishes and salads. I also always eat the leaves. It’s important to get fresh beetroot, with crisp, fresh leaves. They can be wilted slightly and eaten like spinach.

Health Benefitsbeetroot 2

Beetroot is particularly high in Manganese – vital for bones, blood clotting, brain function and more – and folate, a B vitamin used for cell division and DNA formation (hence is necessity during pregnancy). The pigments that make beetroot red/purple are water soluble and provide both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory role capabilities.

Beetroot’s fibre and wealth of antioxidants increase antioxidants in the body and promote the growth of white blood cells – making it and ideal go-to food when your immune system needs a bit of a boost.

Beetroot also contains a high proportion of the amino acid glutathione, which is used in the healing and maintenance of our digestive tract. Beetroot is therefore particularly useful if you have suffer from digestive issues and suspect leaky gut (intestinal hyper permeability).

What’s your favourite way to eat beetroot? Let me know!

Caroline x

P.S. Don’t forget to Like my Facebook page to keep up with what’s going on at Flourish

Living with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome CFS/ME

I was diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in 2010 after I had been virtually housebound for nearly a year. At the time of diagnosis, and to this day, I felt like it was an unnecessary  and useless label. The diagnosis didn’t come with any kind of treatment plan, medication or even advice. It simply came with a “we don’t know much about it, but you’ll probably have this for life”. I was sent on my way believing that that was my lot. Thanks Doctor.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome does more then it says on the tin – and that’s why many CFS suffers are fed up with this vague and dismissible name. CFS/ME is a complex chronic illness that manifests differently among it’s victims and involves not only debilitating fatigue, but also chronic pain, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), brain fog, weight loss, fibromyalgia, headaches, nausea, insomnia, muscle weakness and more.  woman-506120_1920

The causes of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome are still debated, despite it being reported for more than 200 years. It’s likely that there are several triggers, and that a unique mix of factors trigger each individual’s illness.

In addition to viruses as the cause e.g. Epstein Barr, a recent review proposes a disruption of gut microbiota as a possible cause (Navaneetharaja et al. 2016). Our gut microbiome is so important for our long-term health this proposal doesn’t surprise me at all, and it fits with my experience. Because our gut microbes are so important, whether they are disrupted by a pathogenic virus, poor diet, stress or something else, the knock-on effects can be far reaching.  CFS has also been proposed as an autoimmune disease triggered by gut dysbiosis and disruption of the lining of the gastrointestinal tract (Navaneetharaja et al. 2016).

It’s easy to think that the virus that I caught in Costa Rica in 2009 was the culprit, as many studies show connections between CFS and various viruses, but in reality the virus I caught was the straw that broke the camel’s back. My CFS had been simmering away for a long time – I believe since my mid teens.

For me, I believe my immune system has been operating sub-optimally for a long time. I believe that my CFS is a result of gut dysbiosis and autoimmunity.  I know that when I look after my gut and acknowledge my diagnosed autoimmune disease (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis) my symptoms improve. It’s common to collect autoimmune diseases if you don’t catch them early and work at reducing inflammation.

For years I’d had periods of inexplicable exhaustion. As a child I’d happily curl up anywhere and go to sleep. In the summer holidays I remember systematically sleeping in until 11:30am and being shocked by how tired I was, but I simply couldn’t wake up earlier. I’ve never been sporty or energetic and I know I should be in bed at 9pm. I have been constantly cajoled, pestered and teased into doing things – going for walks, staying up late, going to the pub – when my body is crying out for sleep. At university, during my undergraduate, I had one day of SCUBA diving each week in the winter. I’d suffer severe headaches afterwards and I’d be exhausted the next day, barely able to walk to my lectures. In my early 20s I’d wonder if I’d be able to walk to and from town – just a 20 minute walk – but I was unsure of my strength. I remember catching a cold and being in bed for days, and then unable to walk faster than an 80yr old with a Zimmer frame. It was ridiculous and I remember marvelling at my lack of strength.  Each of these episodes passed and, once they had, I continued on with normal life – after all, all the doctors I saw told me I was normal.

Click —>HERE<— for more health news and coaching offers

The final straw

I got seriously ill in 2009, at the end of my PhD. I’d had several quite stressful years during my PhD, but I’d loved my work and was passionate about producing high quality science. I’d worked hard in a very toxic system with no support. I had my ideas and data stolen, suffered abuse of power, manipulation and sexual harassment – things that are rife in academia. No-one had my back. I didn’t have an academic champion or mentor until it was far too late. This stress during my PhD was definitely a huge contributor to my poor health – and a big factor in distancing myself from academia. But it wasn’t the sole cause of my CFS. Many people unhelpfully told me I’d made myself ill by working too hard. While several studies link perfectionism and CFS (as reviewed by Kempke et al. 2015) this isn’t the full story.

What it CFS feels like

The fatigue is like no other. A total exhaustion that stops you from being able to lift your head off of the pillow, from moving your legs to get out of bed, from standing while the kettle boils or from being able to speak. It prevents you from functioning and makes you pause and question the necessity of every action. The brain fog that goes along with it is nothing short of terrifying. I could no longer rely on my brain. I couldn’t recall dates, times, facts or even names of close friends. I couldn’t problem solve. I couldn’t hold a conversation because I couldn’t follow it or remember what had been said or what I had already asked. It was humiliating and scary. I had terrible IBS and, despite eating three or more main meals in a day, I kept loosing weight. I ate and napped. That was it.

I went from being a competent, independent and reasonably intelligent woman to someone who couldn’t communicate with her friends, didn’t have the energy to read and couldn’t walk to the end of the road. I was by myself all day while my husband was at work. I was lonely and down. I needed to be cared for. I needed someone to shop, cook and clean for me, and my husband became my carer.

broccoli-952532__180Slowly I made myself better by focussing on me and allowing myself to put my health first. I took advice, I listened to my body and I learned to let go of anger. I changed my diet, even though my diet was healthy, and my approach to life. I radically reduced carbohydrates and I cut out gluten. I prioritised my sleep and I stopped using chemicals in my home and on my body.

It took time, but I returned to “normal” – at least I was no longer chronically fatigued and ill. I was different though, but in a good way.

I have to keep on top of it, especially since I also have Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, which shares many of the same symptoms as CFS. When I let my diet slip or if I pack too much in (which is a constant tendency),  I know I’ll pay the price.  It’s all about balance.

Go Gluten Free quickly and easily with my new online package – all the resources you need

Do you suffer from CFS or another debilitating illness? I’d love to hear your story.

I’ll be posting soon about the changes I made that helped me get my energy back, so FOLLOW my blog to make sure you don’t miss out.

Want to start feeling better right now? Check out my Reboot  I’ve packed all my best tips on how to get your health back on track in just 4 short weeks. This online package allows you to find your foundation of good health. It guides you through changes that will have long-lasting effects on your symptoms and overall health in a safe and manageable way.  It’s a great start towards taking control of your health and reaching goals!

For more information or to sign-up —-> CLICK HERE <—–C_14

Make sure you join me on Facebook too. Find me at @carolinescoaching and on Twitter @FlourishCP

All the best,

Caroline

 

Pre-launch offer “Go Gluten Free” online package – don’t miss out!

Do you think you may have a problem with gluten?  Yes, going gluten free has become a bit of a fad and many of us are sick of hearing about it.  But, if you have digestive issues, a thyroid disorder or any autoimmune disease, the evidence for going gluten-free is stacking up.  Go gluten free safely and healthily and reduce your symptoms – it’s NOT about swapping to the Free-from food section.

Read my Gluten posts HERE

It’s suggested that everyone with an autoimmune disease can benefit from going gluten-free. This is because gluten causes the release of a substance called Zonulin in our digestive system. Zonulin is responsible for the tight junctions between the cells of our gut lining. Tight junctions control the substances that pass through the gut lining and into the blood stream. When zonulin is high, the tight junctions are loose, meaning that large molecules and microbes can pass through into our blood and be detected by our immune system.

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“Leaky gut”, and therefore gluten, is arguably the root cause of autoimmune diseases, including Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (hypothyroidism), Grave’s disease, Celiac’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis) and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

In fact, for thyroid conditions gluten causes the immune system to attack the thyroid tissue through a processed called molecular mimicry – your immune cells mistake your thyroid cells for gluten and destroy them.

In my Go Gluten Free package, I provide you with the information and tools to safely and easily go gluten free in a healthy and sustainable way.

Click here to get the Go Gluten Free package for the EARLY BIRD Price.

Here are just some things you have the potential to gain:bread-399286_1920

  • Better digestion
  • Better concentration
  • Better weight management
  • Fewer joint aches and pains
  • More energy
  • More stable blood sugar levels
  • Better mood
  • Reduced risk of chronic disease 

If you struggle with gluten, by completing this 4-week coaching package you’ll be healthier, have more energy and may have reduced your risk for chronic illness!

Just a few days to get the Go Gluten Free package for the early bird price.

Sign up HERE for health news and coaching offers!